There is a direct correlation to smoking and one’s health.

From the day a smoker starts smoking their health diminishes over time from the effects of the lethal toxins contained within cigarette smoke.

There has been enough time for statistics and studies to prove that smoking is very bad for one’s health.

There has also been enough time for statistics and studies that have proven one’s health improves dramatically over time when they have quit smoking;.

There is nothing but positive benefits to better health by quitting smoking today.

Smoking and Health effects on individual smokers

Unless they quit, up to half of all smokers will die from their smoking, most of them before their 70th birthday and only after years of suffering a reduced quality of life.

Furthermore, the average smoker will die about eight years earlier than a similar non-smoker. Life expectancy improves after a smoker quits.

There is also strong scientific evidence that smoking is related to more than two dozen diseases and conditions. Fortunately, most of these start to reverse after a smoker quits smoking. In fact, the benefits of quitting may begin in a matter of hours.

All smokers are at extra risk for:

  • Coronary heart disease (for example, heart attacks);
  • Peripheral vascular disease (circulatory problems);
  • Aortic aneurysm;
  • High blood pressure;
  • High cholesterol (LDL);
  • Lung cancer;
  • Cancer of the mouth, throat and voice box;
  • Cancer of the pancreas;
  • Cancer of the kidney, and urinary bladder;
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD);
  • Chronic bronchitis;
  • Emphysema;
  • Pneumonia;
  • Influenza (the “flu”);
  • The common cold;
  • Peptic ulcers;
  • Chronic bowel disease (Crohn’s Disease);
  • Tooth decay (cavities);
  • Gum disease;
  • Osteoporosis;
  • Sleep problems (falling asleep inappropriately and/or frequent waking);
  • Cataracts; and
  • Graves’ disease (a type of thyroid disease).

Female smokers are at an extra risk for:

  • Cancer of the cervix;
  • Menstrual problems;
  • Fertility problems; and
  • Spontaneous abortion (miscarriage).

Male smokers have an extra risk of:

  • Erectile dysfunction (impotence); and
  • Fertility problems (problems with sperm).

There is some scientific evidence that smoking may also be related to cancer of the large intestine and leukemia.

In addition to various diseases, smoking also causes the skin to wrinkle and creates the appearance of premature aging.

Smoking also reduces the sense of smell and taste.